Norwegian Krumkake

Krumkake is a traditional Norwegian cookie that is made for Christmas and also for other special celebrations. It is crispy and wafer like. To make the beautiful pattern a special iron is used for the frying. I have made these cookies as long as I can remember. My mother was an expert and I feel I sometimes succeed and sometimes fail. The trick is to get them thin and crispy. This cookie is also traditional in Sweden and here it is called Rullrån.

St Lucia Saffron Rolls (Lussebulle) and Saffron Cringle (Adventskrans)

It is soon 13:th December and Lucia here in Sweden. And what is a “must” is “Lussebullar” or St Lucia Saffron Rolls.. Saffron Rolls is eaten throughout the whole Advent time which is from 4 Sundays before Christmas. What is also common is to make the Saffron Cringle or Advent Cringle or as it is called in Swedish and Norwegian Adventskrans.

Grønnkåls Suppe (Kale Soup)

My mothers menu this day in 1957 was for 304 people and it was Prinsefisk as the main dish and Kale Soup with egghalves as a side dish. The price 1, 56 NOK ( about 17 cents). The recipe for Prinsefish is on another post. Here is Kale Soup from 1957. Kale Soup was often used as a side dish. Sometimes with egghalves and sometimes with dumplings made from flour and eggs.

Norwegian Prinsefisk (Prince Fish)

There is one recipe in my mothers recipe book from 1957 that made me really curious. The name of the dish is “Prinsefisk” which means Prince Fish. I tried to find out where the name came from and found a fascinating story. In 1957 this recipe was 101 years old. Now this recipe is 164 years old anno 2020. It is considered a festive dish from Bergen, in Norway these days. The dish came about because of a real prince.

Norwegian Viktoriasuppe (Victoriasoup)

In Norway’s traditional cooking when I grew up, a dinner would always be a main dish and dessert.  So in my mothers menues there is always a main dish, sides of vegetables and a dessert or a soup. Soups were used in all variations. I think it was economical and a way to use theContinue reading “Norwegian Viktoriasuppe (Victoriasoup)”